Margaret Pageler - Leadership in water and environmental sustainability
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REAL CHANGE 2003 QUESTIONNAIRE
 

(1) The most important issue in the City. The most important issue is the challenge of rebuilding the economy. My goal is prosperity that is sustainable and broadly shared.

  • I will work with Seattle’ s businesses and institutions to create jobs. Better infrastructure, regulatory changes, vibrant and attractive neighborhoods, a clean environment and public safety are all essential to a city where people want to work and businesses want to grow.
  • will work to reduce the cost of government. I’ve always been the councilmember that watched the budget and tried to protect your pocketbook.
  • will work to protect public health. I restored funding to the community clinics in this last budget cycle to keep the public health safety net strong.

(2) What I would bring to my job. I love serving on City Council because every day I can ensure that you have reliable electricity and clean water, that your basic freedoms and civil rights are protected, that high standards of public health and sanitation guard you from illness.

I bring all my heart, smarts and integrity to public service. In my decade on the Council, I’ve chaired committees on public safety, utilities, water and health. I’ve served on the State and County Boards of Health, with a focus on reducing ethnic health disparities. I chaired the board of the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency, working to protect your lungs.

I’m an environmental champion. I preserved the 90,000-acre Cedar River Watershed, set new standards for water conservation, and won the Municipal League’s Regional Leadership Award for my salmon recovery work.

(3) Goals for homelessness and poverty. I lived in Taiwan as a child when a million mainland China refugees arrived on the island, many of them penniless and homeless. I watched as they set up tiny businesses or vegetable plots. Soon they moved out of their cardboard shacks in the alleys and into apartments or small houses. That’s what I think of when I see homelessness and poverty in Seattle.

I believe we can create a similar cycle of hope and opportunity here if we support one another with high standards and expectations, treatment for addiction and mental illness, and access to micro-loans and similar entry-level assistance.

I will continue to champion public health, both emergency and preventive services, to provide a safety net for the needy.

(4) Super Powers! Seattle already has a cadre of “mutant super-heroes.” They are the scientists and doctors who are finding solutions for the diseases and disabilities that plague the world. Some of them work at non-profits like Seattle Biomedical Research Institute or Fred Hutch. Some are academics at the University of Washington’s genome center or medical school. Gates’ global health programs will find a vaccine against HIV/AIDS and cures or prevention for malaria. Amgen, Zymogenetics and others will produce drugs to manage arthritis, asthma, and the like. Cancer, diabetes, heart disease, the intestinal infections that are the scourge of the developing world – all these and more are within the scope of Seattle’s super-scientists.

With “mutant super-heroes” like these at work to cure the world’s diseases, my job as a Councilmember is to support them with electricity to power their research equipment and building codes that accommodate modern laboratories. That doesn’t require superpowers, just common sense and determination.

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Margaret Pageler.

Margaret Pageler